RITE of SPRING

One of the most cherished traditions in townhouse land is the spring walk-through inspection. Gather the Board and amble around, see what winter has left us with. It is a great bonding experience and it reasserts ownership in taking inventory of your property’s needs.

Somewhat counter-intuitively, I tend to advocate for the minimalist approach. What should capture our attention are things recently out of the ordinary—as within a season or two. Some will argue for an all-inclusive list, following that great American adage, “if some is good, more is better”.

And certainly, one can be pleased with possessing the definitively comprehensive to-do list. But if there isn’t follow up with the to-doing, compiling the uber-list is a misuse of everyone’s time. (Spring walk-through lists have a shelf life of maybe six weeks. No one refers to them come autumn.) In my humble opinion, the list should be comprised of two types of items: 1—Things the Association should fix quickly; 2—Things the homeowner should fix quickly (be they from a repair or behavioral standpoint).

Sure, all the bad gutters or roofs with missing shingles can be identified. If this is going to be a project, why not let those who are going to fix them make the notations? They’ll do a better job. It is tempting to see information for its own sake having an archival or referential purpose. However, information of this sort is very temporal as Mother Nature never stops working.

Anyone besides me remember the Teachings of Don Juan by Carlos Castaneda? To Castaneda’s assertion that “knowledge is power”, Don Juan replies: “What good is knowledge if it is useless?”